The following pages chronicle the journey of the sailing vessel Pelagic and her crew. We are a family of 5; Michael, Amy, Zander, Porter and Anakena, taking our 42' Hallberg Rassy as far as we can comfortably go in three years. We left Oregon in September 2014, participated in the 2014 Baja Haha, continued on through the Panama Canal, into the Caribbean, up the coast of the US to Maritime Canada and from there crossed the Atlantic. After an arrival in Ireland we toured Scotland, then sailed down to France, Portugal and on to Morocco. In January of 2016 we slowed down considerably and enrolled the kids in a local Spanish school in Sanlucar de Guadiana for a few months. In the spring of 2016 we crossed the Atlantic towards the Caribbean. We are now in the Pacific, officially on our way home, albeit via a very circuitous path. We are currently in French Polynesia and looking at weather windows to Hawaii before finally making landfall back in the Pacific Northwest.

Currently our exact location is not available. Our spot coverage will pick us back up in Hawaii towards the end of May, 2017.

Our favorite sailing quote:

"If anythings gonna happen, it's gonna happen out there boss!" Captain Ron






Saturday, October 17, 2015

We crossed the English Channel a little earlier than planned, we checked into a marina in Brest, France and we are currently touring France, Germany and Switzerland.

Let me backtrack a little. We left Wales and expected to tuck into Penzance, England, about 110 miles south of us.  After an overnight sail (actually a motor) we were ready to take a break, having sailed everyday of the last 5 days.  The tides are so strong in the Irish Sea that you don't really want to try to sail against the tide, so instead of doing longer passages, covering a little more ground, with more down time in port, we would only sail about 8 hours a day, a full tide cycle plus a little slack water on each side.  We got some great tide assist and averaged 7-8 knots for all the passages, but the downside was we spent a large part of each day on the water.  Have I mentioned, the passages are not the highlight for us, it is the destinations that we crave, so low mile, full days at sea aren't our favorite.  So, we are tied up in Penzance, walking out of the marina when we think to check the weather for the coming days.  This high pressure system that we have been enjoying is going to end in about 36 hours and if we don't leave soon, we are looking at 40 knot winds for about a week across the English Channel.  Bummer!  So, Mike heads back to the boat to do a few chores, the kids and I take the bus to see Mount Saint Michael, a castle set on a small island that is only accessible at high tide.  We spent a few hours exploring the nooks and cranny's of the castle, we picked up some groceries, grabbed the obligatory fish and chips and motored out of the harbor just as the sun was setting, having spent less than 12 hours in England. For the next 16 hours we dodged tankers in the English Channel and motor sailed into France just as the sun was rising.  So much for England, but I've probably mentioned plans and cruising don't always mesh well!

Anyway, as I mentioned we are land touring and trying to see as much as we can in two weeks (possibly less if we run out of money first).  Until you travel by land, you forget how cheap traveling by boat can be.  We will keep you posted as to our adventures on land.