The following pages chronicle the journey of the sailing vessel Pelagic and her crew. We are a family of 5; Michael, Amy, Zander, Porter and Anakena, taking our 42' Hallberg Rassy as far as we can comfortably go in three years. We left Oregon in September 2014, participated in the 2014 Baja Haha, continued on through the Panama Canal, into the Caribbean, up the coast of the US to Maritime Canada and from there crossed the Atlantic. After an arrival in Ireland we toured Scotland, then sailed down to France, Portugal and on to Morocco. In January of 2016 we slowed down considerably and enrolled the kids in a local Spanish school in Sanlucar de Guadiana for a few months. In the spring of 2016 we crossed the Atlantic towards the Caribbean. We are now in the Pacific, officially on our way home, albeit via a very circuitous path. We are currently in French Polynesia and looking at weather windows to Hawaii before finally making landfall back in the Pacific Northwest.

Currently our exact location is not available. Our spot coverage will pick us back up in Hawaii towards the end of May, 2017.

Our favorite sailing quote:

"If anythings gonna happen, it's gonna happen out there boss!" Captain Ron






Friday, October 3, 2014

SF to Monterey

Headed out of the gate, the wind seems to elude us yet again!  And yet we know there is wind somewhere because the rollers are huge.  We tucked into the safe haven of half moon bay.  Ah, flat seas feel wondrous!  We anchored out, met my grandparents and aunt and uncle for dinner at a local restaurant, and took the rope ferry between dingy dock and shore.  What took half a day to motor/sail took 35 minutes to drive.  The math hardly works.  It starts to work when you get to islands and places beyond the reach of your mini van.  We'll get there.....eventually.  Trying to remember it is the journey, not the destination.  It is a great sight to see the boys playing chess together or one of them curled up in a bunk reading.  The kids seem to be getting their sea legs.  They had a rough initiation with huge swells and little wind to steady the boat.
Santa Cruz, the board walk, preservative laden food was calling the kids.  Alas, their crappy parents forgot to check the website and and Wally World is closed during the week! Well we almost had a mutiny, but we were able to pacify the troops with a promise of an arcade visit the next day.
The highlight of our visit to Santa Cruz was our tying up at the dinghy dock at the public pier.  The floating dock was guarded by half a dozen stellar sea lions that really didn't want to move for us.  They barked, hissed and bluff charged us.  We quickly aborted or attempts to use the ladder in the middle of the dock and submissively climbed the side of the pier.
We didn't stay long in Santa Cruz and crossed the bay to Monterey in the later afternoon.  We've been plagued by the three dominant types of wind; not enough, too much and right on the nose our whole trip.  The crossing to Monterey was perfect; clear skies, 10 knotts of wind and a relatively flat sea.  We were even able to fly the spinnaker, which is flown only in the most perfect conditions! This was the first real sail that was calm enough that the kids could cruise around on the boat.  They practiced raising sails, tying knots, furling everything and everything on the boat and they have quickly become better sailors than I.  Constant curiosity is a wonderful thing!

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