The following pages chronicle the journey of the sailing vessel Pelagic and her crew. We are a family of 5; Michael, Amy, Zander, Porter and Anakena, taking our 42' Hallberg Rassy as far as we can comfortably go in three years. We left Oregon in September 2014, participated in the 2014 Baja Haha, continued on through the Panama Canal, into the Caribbean, up the coast of the US to Maritime Canada and from there crossed the Atlantic. After an arrival in Ireland we toured Scotland, then sailed down to France, Portugal and on to Morocco. In January of 2016 we slowed down considerably and enrolled the kids in a local Spanish school in Sanlucar de Guadiana for a few months. In the spring of 2016 we crossed the Atlantic towards the Caribbean. We are now in the Pacific, officially on our way home, albeit via a very circuitous path. We are currently in French Polynesia and looking at weather windows to Hawaii before finally making landfall back in the Pacific Northwest.

Currently our exact location is not available. Our spot coverage will pick us back up in Hawaii towards the end of May, 2017.

Our favorite sailing quote:

"If anythings gonna happen, it's gonna happen out there boss!" Captain Ron






Wednesday, September 10, 2014

September 1, 2014

Almost there, the countdown is here with 10 days to go!  Mike's surgery was a smashing success, we just have to give him a little time to rest and recuperate.  We are getting a tremendous amount of items checked of the list while the kids are spending time with Grandparents in California and Alaska.  We are actually making things up to add to the list since we have a little more time than we expected.

On the 10th the 5 of us expect to throw of the dock lines for the last time.  We will then head down the Columbia River and sail/motor the 90 miles to Astoria.  From there my Mom will take Anakena and Porter with her to San Francisco and Mike and I, Zander and my uncle Dave will take the boat down the coast of Oregon and  California making our first stop in Bodega Bay, 500 nautical miles away.  The Oregon and Northern California coastal towns are tricky to time for stopping.  Most of them are at river mouths with bars that require the correct winds and tides to enter or leave.  Instead of trying to time it all perfectly, we are just going to make a long downwind run of it, and do it all in one go.  It will be a abrupt initiation into night sailing again, but with three adults taking 2-3 hour watches, it should be comfortable enough.  The prevailing winds this time of year are generally from the Northwest and the California current flows south along the continent.  We should have a nice downwind ride with following seas.  Forecasting is quite good 3-4 days out, so we feel fairly confident we can pick a nice weather window and expect cooperating conditions.  In addition to getting NOAA wind and weather forecasts, we can also get realtime and predicted weather conditions through our high frequency radio.  We have a program that not only shows you a map with the isobars (which I always hated having to interpret while we were in the Southern Ocean), we have a map that gives you wave height, wind direction and speed, for the present time as well as a week out.  At some point you need to have a good understanding of how the high and low pressure systems historically effect the particular area you are in, but it sure is nice to have actual numbers and little arrows indicating wind direction to study.

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